People with Argininosuccinic aciduria who rely on medical foods

Argininosuccinic aciduria is an inherited disorder that causes ammonia to accumulate in the blood. Ammonia, which is formed when proteins are broken down in the body, is toxic if the levels become too high. The nervous system is especially sensitive to the effects of excess ammonia.

Argininosuccinic aciduria usually becomes evident in the first few days of life. An infant with argininosuccinic aciduria may be lacking in energy (lethargic) or unwilling to eat, and have poorly controlled breathing rate or body temperature. Some babies with this disorder experience seizures or unusual body movements, or go into a coma. Complications from argininosuccinic aciduria may include developmental delay and intellectual disability. Progressive liver damage, skin lesions, and brittle hair may also be seen.

Zoey

Argininosuccinic aciduria · Texas
Annual cost: $10200

For now while she is a baby our insurance covers some of her formula, but none of her medically necessary supplements and none of the ...

The Medical Nutrition Equity Act will provide key support for those Americans who rely on medical foods to survive and thrive.